HOW THE NURSING HOME PREVENTS FALLS

Every year the average nursing home will have between 100 to 200 patient falls. The people who fall the most often are men, and patients who are confused. Men fall almost twice as often as women because they are less likely to call for assistance, because it is more difficult for them to admit needing help. Patients with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia fall frequently, because they no longer have safety awareness. ¬†Statistics tell us that 35% of those patients who fall are unable to walk, yet they try.

Most patient falls happen in the patient’s room, when the person is attempting something without assistance. Few falls happen in places like a dining room or at a nurses station where many staff members are available to monitor for unsafe behaviors. The majority of those falls in patient rooms have to do with needing to go to the bathroom. Being incontinent of urine, having diarrhea, and having to urinate frequently at night all contribute to the high number of falls.

Added risk factors are poor vision, going bare foot, clutter on the floor, poor lighting and possible a slippery/wet floor from the patient becoming incontinent. As well as the patient forgetting to reach for their cane or walker in their rush to the bathroom.

A nursing home fall prevention program includes assessing each and every patient for their fall risk. All of the above mentioned problems are identified. A plan of care is developed and all staff members are informed of the plan. Safety devices are put in place, most of those devices are in the form of alarms. A good web site for safety devices is -www.Rehabmart.com. Their site is very user friendly and they have a large selection of safety alarms.

Looking at the environment, follows the assessment. Are the grab bars placed correctly? If the patinet is getting out of bed, is the bed in a low position, with an alarm? Is the lighting adequate, are there motion sensors in place? Is the patient on a regular toileting schedule before bed? How often does the staff check on them during the night?

A big deterrent for falls is a busy, engaged patient, a patient who has activities to go to that they enjoy. A patient who is really tired when it is time for bed, that they enjoy a good nights sleep.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Restorative Nursing and Gerontology