MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT – NOT ALWAYS EARLY DEMENTIA

“I think mom might have early Alzheimer’s disease” says the worried son. “I saw the other day that she had left the burner on the stove on, and walked into another room.” I wouldn’t worry too much about one incident the dementia specialist said, “sometimes I do things like that myself.”

The dementia specialist is over sixty-five herself, and knows she has a problem with distraction. As a person ages they begin to become more easily distracted. The classic story is always about walking into a room and forgetting what you are there for. If someone talked to you while you were going to get something, or you answered the phone on the way, you became distracted. I frequently remind people of times they might have forgotten where their car was parked.

The concerned son should keep his eyes open for other changes. How is his mom doing cooking? If she always was a great cook and made many things from memory, and still does, nothing to worry about there. If on the other hand she now has problems with things like measuring, getting confused with familiar recipes or putting together a meal, these could indicate a problem.

If his mom always followed the news, and now seems to be having trouble remembering news and recent events, this would indicate a problem. The problem comes when there is a change. If the person never was interested in the news, this is just in line with their personality.

If mom never was much for handling finances, then her lack of money sense is just her. However if mom always knew the price of everything on her shopping list, and now shows problems with handling money, it is time to take a close look.

If mom knows what day it is, doesn’t get lost in familiar places and recognizes people around her, and there are no other noticeable changes, then the stove incident was a simple lapse. Yes, a potentially safety issue, and mom should be as concerned as everyone else that she had this lapse. She should vocalize, that she will make an effort to focus more on what she is doing. But if there are indications in the kitchen that there have been other safety events. Such as burned cutting boards, charred pots, pans, cooking utensils, or possibly missing items because they were discarded after an incident. It is now time to closely monitor mom.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing