EARLY STAGE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND CAREGIVING

Caregiving for the person in early stage of Alzheimer’s disease, is in some ways very different from the mid-stage and late stage caregiver role.

The early stage caregiver is in many ways a companion. A very alert and involved companion. A person who is proactive in preventing accidents. Looking at the confused person’s environment, while not changing the environment, (which would increase confusion) but modifying as needed for safety. Knowing the confused elder may no longer be that aware of tripping hazards, the danger of walking in busy parking lots, or handling hot food. So many areas in our, day to day lives, where our own personal safety awareness and good judgement keep us safe.

Helping the confused elder with communication difficulties. Giving the person that extra time they now need to get their thoughts in order. Not rushing the person as they are searching for words, and when providing those words, doing it in a way that is supportive not critical.

By offering frequent reminders of where the person is and what is going on. When the person has a concerned puzzled look on her face, the caregiver gently reminds her that she is at the mall, close to her home. Providing information to the date, time of year, temperature and most of all who people are in relation to the confused elder.

Keeping to a routine and familiar places gives the mildly confused person a sense of security. When that is not possible, as in the case of a change in residence. The caregiver needs to use less verbal directions and more walking a person through the new environment. Accessing that body memory through repetition, by doing something over and over, can re-create that routine and familiarity. Routine and familiarity bring comfort.

Taking time, while stepping back and trying to see what might increase confusion, and what the caregiver can provide to decrease that confusion.

The need that remains is always the same throughout the disease process, is for the the caregiver to be so very kind and understanding. Understanding of the struggles the person is facing to still be here. Support to still maintain their independence as much and as long as possible.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing