8 QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN CAREGIVING FOR THE PERSON WITH DEMENTIA AND DIFFICULT BEHAVIORS

The person with dementia no longer reacts the way they used to, many times resulting in problem behaviors. When you have identified a problem behavior, which can be anything from the elder spitting, to striking out at a caregiver, or even becoming sexually inappropriate, start with identifying exactly what is happening.

8 Steps to understanding difficult behaviors in the person with dementia:

  1. Identify the problem or behavior. Make sure you are clear as to what the problem is, and whose problem is it. In the case of the elder with dementia who spits; it is embarrassing, someone has to clean it up, and many times it is hard to find a caregiver for the elder.
  2. Identify when this behavior occurs. Does this behavior only happen during times of direct care? Such as the elder who strikes out during times of dressing, bathing, or brushing teeth.
  3. Identify how often this behavior happens. Does this behavior only happen occasionally, as during a large holiday get together? Does this behavior happen only later in the day when the elder is tired?
  4. Identify how long the behavior lasts. Is this behavior of short duration, and once the incident is over it is quickly forgotten by the elder?
  5. Identify what is going on in the environment when the behavior happens. Is the environment understandable to the elder? Remember the elder with dementia needs a time of transition between activities. He can no longer just switch from one conversation to another, or do several things at the same time such as eating and watching TV.
  6. Identify who is present when the behavior happens. Does someone present tend to startle or surprise the elder? Does someone seem to not know how to approach the elder? Is someone asking a lot of questions the elder is no longer able to understand? Does someone have expectations of the elder that they are no longer able to meet? Does someone present seem to be critical of the elder.
  7. Identify how intense the behavior is. Is this behavior of such intensity that is scares the elder as well as all who are present?
  8. Identify if there is more than one thing contributing to the problem. Especially if the elder has been having trouble sleeping and may be suffering from sleep deprivation. If the elder’s behavior becomes more difficult in the late afternoon, see if the elder has an problem with oxygen deprivation. Many elders who are more agitated later in the day may benefit from a sleep study.

Finding out what happened right before, or what is happening during the behavior, is of the most importance, when care giving for the person with dementia.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing