BUILDING BRAIN HEALTH PROTECTS AGAINST DEMENTIA – DON’T PERFUME YOUR OXYGEN PART III

Whether it is bath soap, air freshener, laundry products, scented candles, or the cologne on the check out clerk at your local grocery, we are surrounded by scented air. While it is law to list ingredients on these products, there is a significant loop-hole. The word “fragrance” in so many products used every day, represents many substances the average person would not consider a pleasant odor. These chemicals masquerading as a fragrance, are for the most part derived from petroleum and coal tar products.  These chemical concoctions are found is products all around us, and are directly related to many health concerns.

These chemical mixtures are protected under a misconception that they are “trade secrets.”  There might have been a time in years gone past that the combination of certain essential oils and flowers were highly protected secrets. However these days, the secret that is being protected, is where these chemicals come from and what they do to human health.

Current research is telling us compared to other senses, the sense of smell is directly connected to brain health. That smells are able to pass the blood brain barrier, that protects the brain from many other forms of attack. These hundreds of fragrances created in laboratories, with many times banned chemicals, are responsible for many disorders. Surrounding ourselves with all of these scents is leading to negative emotions, irritability, brain fog, fatigue, headaches, dizziness, tremors, convulsions, and the list is growing.

There is recently even a new term for that person, who through the use of strong smelling products, intrudes on others. It is “second hand fragrance” similar to second hand smoke. It is when one person makes a decision to use several strong smelling products (shampoo, deodorant, hair spray, perfume, laundry products) and by doing so contaminates the air quality of others. There was a recent report on the news regarding sunscreen products, and they found many people bought a product not on how effective it was for sun protection, but because of the way it smelled.

The elderly as well as the very young are at increased risk for neurological problems connected to fragrances that pass the blood brain barrier. Yet many times the offender is an elderly person who has become so addicted to their fragrance, that they literally no longer smell it.

If you have been guilty of second hand fragrance, do what people did years ago, put a little vanilla extract behind your ears.

Suggested reading: “Get A Whiff of This” by Connie Pitts

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing