WHEN DEMENTIA AND CONFUSION AREN’T PERMANENT – SUDDEN DELIRIUM

I receive emails from families who can’t understand what has happened to Mom, Dad, Uncle Charlie and so on. You see this person was just fine a couple of weeks age, driving, shopping, living alone, balancing their check book, and now the doctor says Mom has Alzheimer’s disease and needs to live in a nursing home. What usually happened is that Mom had an infection, an accident, change in medication or surgery and this put Mom into a state of delirium

Synonyms for delirium are; irrational, raving, deranged, and yes even demented. Once the stress is over, the elder returns to their previous state of cognition. But what if Mom is in the hospital when she becomes delirious? The hospital personnel don’t know Mom and  don’t recognize her delirium. Mom will be labelled a confused, demented elder and medicated to keep her under control and “safe.” This will only lead to increased confusion making Mom appear even more confused.

The presence of delirium can indicate that the elder’s brain has a decrease in capacity and may indicate an increased risk of developing dementia. The healthcare community sees delirium frequently with the elderly and infrequently with the young. The same person can have had no history of delirium, even though they have experienced several hospitalizations, yet when they are old, they become confused and disoriented every time they are admitted.

Whenever there is a sudden change in an elder’s ability to think, focus, reason, and remember, look back to whatever stress could have caused the change. The longer the person suffers from delirium, the more chance it will not be resolved.

Remember Alzheimer’s Disease is slow, delirium is fast and doesn’t have to be permanent.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing