HOW TO CHOOSE A NURSING HOME FOR A PERSON WITH DEMENTIA Part I

Choosing a nursing home for the person with dementia, is about where the person is in their disease process, as well as what their finances are and will be. The competition is currently very high for nursing homes caring for persons with Alzheimer’s disease.  This climate has brought forward many, very innovative programs. Programs that include plants, animals, special menus and dining options, activity programs for special interests, art, music, and the list goes on.  When a person is in the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease, they are more able to make use of special programs. Later in the disease process the person will have less interest or ability to participate in such programs.

Because many of the high end programs are usually found in private pay facilities, when assessing the elder’s finances, it makes good sense to use those resources when the elder can most enjoy them. Knowing that there is a progression to this disease, and that there is a slow decline, helps in planning. In the early stage of the disease, more funds should be available not only for the nursing facility but also for community events.  Going on outings, shopping, to a movie, out to lunch, to the zoo, etc., these opportunities need to be available.

When visiting a nursing home ask to see the activity calendar. Look for not only internal opportunities but for those outside events. Ask how they are funded, does facility have their own van, do nursing assistants accompany the elders as well as activity staff.

I well remember a nursing home that sponsored an outing to the zoo for its patients. The patients who participated were in early stage of Alzheimer’s disease.  Everything was going fine until the first patient went to sit down on a park bench and missed the bench falling to the ground. About 30 minutes later a second patient did the same thing. (both without injury)  The nursing home administrator decided it was time for this group to return to the facility. Thereafter a group never went out without a member of the nursing department, trained in Alzheimer’s care, in attendance.

Ask if there is a special memory loss unit? Is there a director of that unit? Interview the director and inquire not only about their program but also how they assess their patients for activities. The director should use terms like “person centered care” as well as vocalize an interest in your loved one’s history and “favorites.” Favorite foods, beverages, sports, music, any art interests, and more questions that would help the facility to design a program for your loved one.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing