EARLY STAGE DEMENTIA – SYMPTOMS OF EARLY CONFUSION

Harry has currently un-diagnosed early stage dementia. How can he be so happy and content, seemingly unfazed by his confusion. All due to his wife Ann’s attention.

Harry’s wife of over 45 years was at his side while he greeted friends outside of church. Harry loves to talk and has many friends. These friends don’t seem to notice that Harry is having memory retrieval problems.  And that is all due to the wife at his side who is seamlessly providing words and cues to Harry. Harry never seems to be stumbling in his conversation or  searching for words. Ann knows Harry so well that she just fills in for him with the right word at the right time and he accepts her help.

At this point in time Harry might not even be aware of his memory loss, his wife makes no effort to point it out to him. Harry drives the couple around but you know it is Ann who is navigating because Harry would be disoriented without her.

This partner in life, is now the decision maker, for today deciding where the couple will go for lunch. Because of their warm trusting relationship, Harry trusts Ann to now manage their finances.  When shopping he might just joke that the “little lady takes care of all of those money things.” This saves Harry the stress of trying to pay bills, balance the checkbook, and make poor financial decisions, all signs of early stage dementia.

Emotional outbursts and anger directed at others and situations come from anger at oneself. The person who has early stage dementia and rejects any help or assistance from others may be a risk to himself and others. The inability to change a bad behavior is a symptom of early stage dementia.

For Harry, the frustration that accompanies trying to understand where he is, what is going on, and what might be expected of him is all reduced because of his partner, and yes now his caregiver, Ann.

Virginia Garberding

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing