ADULT COLORING BOOKS – GREAT ACTIVITY FOR SENIOR WITH DEMENTIA

Adult coloring books are everywhere, from the internet to your neighborhood craft or book store. The choices are suddenly endless from floral, to animals and even the chance to color the masters of the art world. In this fast paced, goal driven, digital age, opening a fresh new coloring book and colors is soothing in itself. Taking any individual to a place of quiet and relaxation, but especially so for the senior with dementia..

For the person with Alzheimer’s disease, or another related disease causing dementia, coloring brings many benefits.  Coloring is among other things, an activity of reminiscing. Everyone remembers the wonderful feeling of opening a new box of crayons. And if you were the fortunate child who had the set of 64 with the built in sharpener, the feeling was quite amazing.

Coloring, gives the senior with dementia an opportunity to be successful. When you color it gives you chances to make decisions about which picture to color, where to start and which color to use. For a person with dementia who makes many mistakes all day long, due to memory loss, coloring is very safe. Art is in the eye of the beholder and there is no way to be wrong.

Find a quiet place, avoid a cluttered kitchen table, instead pick a place where the supplies can be spread out and enjoyed as well. Do not have the distraction of a TV, or even a radio unless it offers soft background music, preferably without lyrics. Even if the person with dementia never cared for art or crafts before, this is an area where they can do well now. This activity doesn’t require remembering facts, people, places or use any language skills. Just the ability to hold onto a coloring pencil or crayon.

When a person does an activity mainly engaging the right side of the brain where art, music and the softer side of life resides, it becomes a little vacation for the mind. As almost a form of meditation it can bring mindfulness to the person and make them more focused. Distraction is a major problem with dementia and developing activities which bring greater focus are worth the effort.

Having many coloring books and colored pencils or crayons around is a great way for the senior to do an activity with a child. The child knows instinctively how to get to the right side of the brain where there is only color, choices to be made and those spaces to be filled in.

Not only is coloring a great activity for the senior with dementia, it is also great for his caregiver. Time can fly when you are engrossed only in choosing which page to color next or what color to use. And the companionship created while you compliment each others work of art creates a pleasant feeling of friendship for both. Feelings that can last long after the crayons are put away.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Restorative Nursing and Gerontology

 

LET MUSIC HELP WITH DEMENTIA CARE

Anyone who has ever attended a concert has experienced a large group of people with synchronized brains. As a piece of music is played with emotion, dopamine is released in the brain and a person experiences pleasure. Added to that, a recognizable rhythm pattern and everyone’s brain is happy and synchronized.

Music affects deep emotions in the brain, releasing dopamine. As soon as a well-loved melody begins, small amounts of dopamine are released in the brain in anticipation. Anticipation, of the strong emotional, well remembered places in the music, yet to come. You know those parts that everyone remembers and sings along to. During especially emotional moments in the music an increase of dopamine is released. Dopamine makes, listening to familiar music with familiar rhythm, very rewarding for the listener.

Dopamine has long been considered the feel good neurotransmitter in the brain. A high level of dopamine helps with physical movement, positive emotions and is the reward transmitter. Many positive things in life can increase dopamine in the brain and music is one of them.

When a piece of music is unfamiliar the brain tries to search for that familiar rhythm, or note sequence. In the case of a jazz piece where there are odd or unexpected rhythms. The brain can’t connect to something familiar. Not only will dopamine not be released, but the experience may become difficult, stressful and unpleasant.

Give the confused person with dementia an opportunity to have that happy, good feeling music has to offer. Play some familiar music that allows the listener to “feel” a memory. Then go the extra step and synchronize your brains, sing along.

Virginia Garberding RN
Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing