WOULD YOU LIKE TO NOT ONLY IMPROVE THE OXYGEN TO YOUR BRAIN BUT FEEL LIKE YOU ARE STANDING ON THE BEACH?

Everyone knows how great they feel when standing by water or walking through the mountains and the air is just so clean and clear. That beach can be a close as your refrigerator. A simple fruit can give you that feeling and so much more. Drinking lemon juice can improve the bodies oxygen level, increase your brain function as well as support numerous digestive functions.

It all has to do with negative ions, those tasteless, odorless, invisible molecules that are found in places with water in the air. This can be after a drenching spring rain, that invigorating morning shower, walking in the morning mountain dew, or when standing next to a large body of water watching the waves come in.

When you breath in this negative ion charged air, these ions once in the blood stream relieve stress, decrease depression, and increase energy.  Studies show that increasing negative ions is as effective for treating depression as anti-depressants.  Negative ions increase blood flow to the brain giving the person increased alertness and more energy, all the while making the person’s mood lighter and increasing their happiness.

Lemons more than any other fruit are loaded with these negative ions. Also the high level of potassium in lemons help nourish brain cells and give energy. This is not lemonade which is a sugar product, with the sugar negating all the positive effects of lemon juice. This product if bottled needs to be a 100% organic lemon juice to realize benefits. If buying organic lemons you want to pick out the heaviest ones with the thinnest skins that will have more juice and be sweeter.

Drinking lemon juice first thing in the morning can support liver function. Instead of spending money on expensive detox programs, get in the habit of drinking a cup of hot water with lemon first thing every morning. Lemon juice will also aid in indigestion issues such as heartburn,  bloating, burping, and belching. When you stop eating all processed food and start adding lemon juice to your daily intake you can look forward to better health.

Breathing like you are at the ocean, increased alertness, and better digestion, lemon juice – quite the bargain!

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

BUILDING BRAIN HEALTH PROTECTS AGAINST DEMENTIA – PART I

There is an often repeated saying in healthcare, “what is good for the heart is good for the brain.” And I might add vise-versa, what is good for the brain is also good for the heart. So what is the heart brain connection, blood supply and oxygen.

The brain has 100 billion cells, which is also the number of stars in the galaxy. All of those cells need to be constantly fed, requiring a constant blood supply to keep up the metabolic demands. At all times over 20% of the blood in the body is located in the brain. That blood supply always needs to be highly oxygenated. Loss of oxygen for even 8-10 minutes can result in brain damage.

What is good for the heart and brain:

  • a oxygen rich environment
  • highly nutritious diet and hydration
  • low stress life style

We know that when a person has been diagnosed with dementia, they have already lost brain cells. Brain cells will die due to disease and poor life style choices. Smoking will not only suffocate the lungs but reduce that brain sustaining oxygen supply. Bad dietary choices create inflammation and are now proven to be as harmful as smoking.

This complex organ, the brain, is only 3-4 pounds depending on the size of the individual, about the size of a cantaloupe. When a baby is born they already have their 100 billion cells, what they don’t have is the connections between the cells. And those trillions of cell connections we call learning. To support that development, and even to survive, the brain needs the nutrients and oxygen from the heart.

The blood supply to the brain is so important that when the body experiences a reduction in oxygen it will automatically redirect blood to the brain. Increasing the blood supply even two times the normal volume.

Improving the supply of oxygen and nutrition to the heart and brain, can be accomplished day by day, meal by meal, through life style changes. Start by opening a window.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing 

 

TEMPORARY DEMENTIA – REVERSIBLE DEMENTIA REALLY?

Really, there are some conditions that cause temporary dementia and are reversible. While there are many diseases or physical conditions that can cause dementia, some are reversible. Seeking medical assistance as soon as possible may make the difference in preventing any permanent brain damage.

Delirium often times resembles dementia so much so, that someone who knows the elder is very necessary to give a history, of the recent state of confusion. Dementia from a disease process develops slowly over time. However delirium may develop within hours, in the elderly. Knowing what is normal for the elder and the speed at which he became confused, is a significant part of the diagnosis. Many things can cause delirium, frequently in the elderly it is an infection. As well as the elder who becomes confused every time they are in the hospital, due to anesthesia.

Medications , when looking for the cause of sudden confusion, referencing the list of medications that can cause delirium is a good place to start. As the liver and kidneys age they are less able to remove medications from the body and the elder gets a build up of toxins. Added to this may be declining health and the number of medications our elders are now taking, can set the elder up for developing delirium, and a diagnosis of dementia.

Brain Tumor, the first symptom of slow growing brain tumors in the elderly, very much resembles dementia. Brain tumors are know to cause changes in cognition and even personality changes.

Depression, some people with depression may complain of forgetfulness, they looks sad or worried, have trouble concentrating, and look depressed. The important thing to notice is was the person depressed and then became confused? Or was the person experiencing mental decline, and that is what caused the depression. If in fact the depression came first, the symptoms that followed can be reversed when the depression is addressed.

Vitamin B12 deficiency, or pernicious anemia will cause confusion, slowness, irritability and the person appears to have lost their get up and go. Even though vitamin B12 is plentiful in the American diet, this deficiency develops because the elder can no longer absorb the vitamin and requires injections.

Water on the brain, hydrocephalus, an excess of spinal fluid around the brain. This can be caused by a head trauma, but usually begin without an obvious cause in the elderly. The elder literally slows down, walking as if their feet are stuck to the floor. They will lose bladder control as well as become confused. If the condition is caught early and a shunt is put in place to drain the fluid, the person can return to previous level of function.

As always, early identification of changes as well as quick intervention is the answer to mental recovery.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

ADULT COLORING BOOKS – GREAT ACTIVITY FOR SENIOR WITH DEMENTIA

Adult coloring books are everywhere, from the internet to your neighborhood craft or book store. The choices are suddenly endless from floral, to animals and even the chance to color the masters of the art world. In this fast paced, goal driven, digital age, opening a fresh new coloring book and colors is soothing in itself. Taking any individual to a place of quiet and relaxation, but especially so for the senior with dementia..

For the person with Alzheimer’s disease, or another related disease causing dementia, coloring brings many benefits.  Coloring is among other things, an activity of reminiscing. Everyone remembers the wonderful feeling of opening a new box of crayons. And if you were the fortunate child who had the set of 64 with the built in sharpener, the feeling was quite amazing.

Coloring, gives the senior with dementia an opportunity to be successful. When you color it gives you chances to make decisions about which picture to color, where to start and which color to use. For a person with dementia who makes many mistakes all day long, due to memory loss, coloring is very safe. Art is in the eye of the beholder and there is no way to be wrong.

Find a quiet place, avoid a cluttered kitchen table, instead pick a place where the supplies can be spread out and enjoyed as well. Do not have the distraction of a TV, or even a radio unless it offers soft background music, preferably without lyrics. Even if the person with dementia never cared for art or crafts before, this is an area where they can do well now. This activity doesn’t require remembering facts, people, places or use any language skills. Just the ability to hold onto a coloring pencil or crayon.

When a person does an activity mainly engaging the right side of the brain where art, music and the softer side of life resides, it becomes a little vacation for the mind. As almost a form of meditation it can bring mindfulness to the person and make them more focused. Distraction is a major problem with dementia and developing activities which bring greater focus are worth the effort.

Having many coloring books and colored pencils or crayons around is a great way for the senior to do an activity with a child. The child knows instinctively how to get to the right side of the brain where there is only color, choices to be made and those spaces to be filled in.

Not only is coloring a great activity for the senior with dementia, it is also great for his caregiver. Time can fly when you are engrossed only in choosing which page to color next or what color to use. And the companionship created while you compliment each others work of art creates a pleasant feeling of friendship for both. Feelings that can last long after the crayons are put away.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Restorative Nursing and Gerontology

 

EXERCISE FOR PARKINSON’S DISEASE AND THE BRAIN – CROSSING THE MID-LINE

Boxing and Parkinson’s Disease

I recently saw a news show on television that highlighted the benefits of boxing, for persons with Parkinson’s disease. While everyone interviewed identified positive results, all the way from; moving better, to being motivated and at times being pushed to participate.  Those who strongly recommended boxing never really hit the nail on the head, and told us why this sport would work so well.

Boxing and Crossing the Mid-line

Picture an imaginary line from your head to your feet cutting your body in half. Every time you do something with your right hand and arm, swinging to your left and therefore crossing your mid-line you also increase the right-left connection in your brain. Watching the show and seeing the participants either hitting a punching bag, or in a ring hitting an instructor, you can easily see the therapy involved. When they punched with their right hand they frequently crossed over their body and hit the opponent on the right side of his body.

The brains two sides coordinate with their opposite side of the body. All of the connections happen in the middle of the brain called the limbic system. Exercises that cross the mid-line, reinforce and support  the connections in the limbic system. The limbic system is also the site of emotional intelligence, explaining why people feel happy after exercise.

Creating exercises that cross the mid-line

A simple balance exercise turned into a brain exercise can include swinging arms across the body. Kicking a leg across the mid-line while holding on to a chair is a simple brain movement. Bouncing a ball in front of you, with your right hand and then switching to your left hand, crosses the mid-line. Starting with a larger bouncing ball and then scaling down to a smaller and smaller ball also improves balance.

Great games with small children such as a bean bag toss when done crossing the mid-line, is a fun way to exercise the brain. Older children enjoy playing catch, and can start by just bouncing a large ball back and forth. Till they then can catch a ball in midair and switch up to a smaller ball.

Take that even further by hitting a tennis ball, volley ball, anything that provides that movement of crossing the body. Especially so for the confused elder who enjoys just throwing a beach ball around the family circle, or maybe a wild game of balloon toss. The easiest mid-line exercise for just about everyone, is to cross your arms and give yourself a big hug. The limbic system, is why that feels so good!

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

DEMENTIA 101 – DISEASES THAT CAUSE DEMENTIA

Dementia is not a disease. The word dementia refers to a number of symptoms such as a decline in the ability to reason, remember, and even focus and think. There are many diseases that cause dementia and because each disease affects the brain in different ways, the word “dementia” is a broad term.

The most prominent disease is Alzheimer’s because it affects so many more people than Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, even stroke. Not only do the diseases resulting in dementia, affect the brain in many different ways, the cause and rate at which the dementia progresses is also variable.

In Alzheimer’s disease the outer layers of the brain are most affected resulting in the loss of memory and language. Other diseases such as Parkinson’s, and Hydrocephalus (fluid on the brain), affect the inner parts of the brain. This results in a decrease in the speed of thinking and an inability to initiate movement. Many times a person with Parkinson’s will actually get “stuck” in place while walking. They had a sudden inability to move and need to take a step backwards before they can once again go forward.

Dementia can also be the result of a severe trauma to the brain. Head injury resulting in blood clots can cause dementia. Brain tumors, a Vitamin B-12 deficiency, hypothyroidism, and of course multiple strokes may result in dementia.

As in all conditions what you are looking for is a change. If a person never could remember names, and they run into someone at the mall that they haven’t seen for years, and don’t know their name, it doesn’t mean they have Alzheimer’s disease. But when something is different and unusual for the person, especially if it has come on quickly, that requires a visit to the doctor for testing. Testing to rule out infection, drug interactions, depression, nutritional deficiencies, all of those things that can make a person appear to have Alzheimer’s disease.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

 

Dementia 101 – The First Case of Alzheimer’s Disease

Auguste Deter was born in 1850, and met Dr. Alzheimer in 1901 at the Institute for the Mentally Ill, Frankfurt, Germany. Dr Alzheimer was a psychiatrist and neuropathologist at the institute. This is Auguste’s story.

Auguste was married to Karl Deter, and was a housewife.  At the time Karl sought help at the institute, Auguste; had no sense of time/or place, and she wasn’t sleeping at night. During the day she was dragging sheets all over the house, she was very paranoid and was constantly accusing Karl of having affairs. She was having trouble with language and writing, as well as having signs of anxiety, mistrust and withdrawal, and oh yes, Auguste would also scream for hours.

Auguste was a danger to herself, especially in the kitchen using knives. She was recorded as saying repeatedly “I have lost myself.” Even though the institute was a scary place, known to the locals as the “Castle of the Insane,” her husband had no choice but to bring her there.  Karl was a middle aged man who had to work and no one else was able to care for her.

For thousands of years when the elderly had symptoms of memory loss doctors thought this was just normal aging.  Auguste Deter on the other hand wasn’t elderly, she was only 51 when she first met Dr. Alzheimer. He worked with her documenting her behaviors, memory problems, lose of her words, anger issues and constant paranoia. And later when he left the institute he requested that on her death Auguste’s brain be sent to him.

Auguste died at the age of 55, and her brain was sent to Dr. Alzheimer. Dr. Alzheimer had a very famous friend at that time, Carl Zeiss who had just invented the first distortion free microscope. Dr. Alzheimer took Auguste’s brain tissue, froze it and then sliced and stained the tissue. Putting it under the microscope, magnified 100’s of times he saw for the first time the plaques and tangles later to be known as Alzheimer’s disease.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Restorative Nursing and Gerontology

FAST ONSET DEMENTIA – PROBABLY DELIRIUM

PART I

THE DEFINITION OF DELIRIUM: A condition of acute and sudden onset of impairment of attention, memory, orientation, language usage, consciousness, perception, behavior and/or emotions that may fluctuate. This is a condition that is directly related to a medical cause and is not due to dementia. It is often called “acute confusion.”

This is not the confusion associated with a terminal condition that occurs in the days before dying. This “terminal delirium” is irreversible and often calls for the use of anti-psychotic medications for the comfort of the patient. Sudden onset delirium is reversible and requires testing for possible cause.

Delirium caused by a medical condition is often confused with dementia and requires a clear history from the family. The areas to report to your healthcare provider are;

  • Is the person more confused today than yesterday? Was this a sudden change in the person’s mental status? If the person is more confused and the increase came on suddenly, you need to consider delirium.
  • Is the person more easily distracted, unable to focus his attention or unable to follow what is being said, than previously? A person with mild cognitive impairment can usually say the days of the week backwards or recite the months of the year backwards. The person with delirium is too distracted to focus on a task like this.
  • Is the person’s thinking disorganized or incoherent? Is the person rambling, has an illogical flow of ideas, or engages in irrelevant conversation? Ask the person a few questions to assess their train of thought:
  1. Will a stone float on water?
  2. Are there fish in the sea?
  3. Does one pound weigh more than two pounds?
  4. Can you use a hammer to pound a nail?

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

LET MUSIC HELP WITH DEMENTIA CARE

Anyone who has ever attended a concert has experienced a large group of people with synchronized brains. As a piece of music is played with emotion, dopamine is released in the brain and a person experiences pleasure. Added to that, a recognizable rhythm pattern and everyone’s brain is happy and synchronized.

Music affects deep emotions in the brain, releasing dopamine. As soon as a well-loved melody begins, small amounts of dopamine are released in the brain in anticipation. Anticipation, of the strong emotional, well remembered places in the music, yet to come. You know those parts that everyone remembers and sings along to. During especially emotional moments in the music an increase of dopamine is released. Dopamine makes, listening to familiar music with familiar rhythm, very rewarding for the listener.

Dopamine has long been considered the feel good neurotransmitter in the brain. A high level of dopamine helps with physical movement, positive emotions and is the reward transmitter. Many positive things in life can increase dopamine in the brain and music is one of them.

When a piece of music is unfamiliar the brain tries to search for that familiar rhythm, or note sequence. In the case of a jazz piece where there are odd or unexpected rhythms. The brain can’t connect to something familiar. Not only will dopamine not be released, but the experience may become difficult, stressful and unpleasant.

Give the confused person with dementia an opportunity to have that happy, good feeling music has to offer. Play some familiar music that allows the listener to “feel” a memory. Then go the extra step and synchronize your brains, sing along.

Virginia Garberding RN
Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing