IS DEMENTIA THE SAME AS MENTAL ILLNESS?

Mental illness is a broad term for disorders that affect thinking and behaviors. That, at first glance, can sound like dementia. However, there are known causes for many forms of mental illnesses. Also, strong effective treatment programs will include cognitive behavioral therapy, which is not used for persons with dementia.

Mental illnesses range from mood disorders; major depression, anxiety disorders, panic disorders, personality disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, to psychiatric disorders; anti-social, narcissistic, schizophrenic, and so many more.  These conditions are traceable to poor parenting practices, childhood trauma, bereavement, unemployment conditions, social stresses including cultural stresses, as well as abuses; drug abuse, cannabis, and alcohol abuse.

Cognitive behavioral therapy involves helping the individual in identifying their distressing thoughts, while seeing how realistic these thought patterns really are. This therapy, stresses working on distorted thinking, and coming up with positive problem solving techniques. Consistently focusing on how valid the person’s thoughts are, as well as examining how useful this thinking is to the individual. Cognitive behavioral therapy when successful will change troubling behaviors.

In order to be successful with this therapy the person has to possess the ability to reason. Loss of reason and judgement are early signs of dementia. As well as loss of the ability to focus, persons with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease, are very easily distracted.  Persons with dementia, due to Alzheimer’s disease, will have short term and eventually long term memory loss.  Memory loss not a symptom of mental illness.

Above all, despite the changes seen in the individual with a dementing illness, he is not really distressed by his losses. For the most part his frustration is due to misunderstanding the environment and cooping with the loss of communication skills.  In contrast, persons with mental illness are very much distressed by their thoughts and behaviors.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing