SUGAR CRAVINGS AND THE ELDER WITH DEMENTIA

Please, please can’t you open the ice cream parlor now?” the elderly woman begged the activity aide. Once again the young activity aide explained to Hannah, that it was 8 o’clock in the morning, and they don’t open the ice cream parlor till 2 in the afternoon.

The pain was easy to see in the elderly woman as she was turned away. Anyone who has experienced cravings can understand how she felt. Sugar craving is nothing new to millions of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes.

The craving for sugar is physical and so mental. For the elder with dementia and sugar cravings the time of day doesn’t matter. The fact that she had just had breakfast doesn’t matter. The fact that this tiny old lady just couldn’t be physically hungry doesn’t matter.

Hannah doesn’t remember that breakfast she just had. She will clearly tell you that no body feeds her at the nursing home. Because she believes it. Hannah knows what it feels like to be hungry and right now she is craving some ice cream and so she must be hungry.

For persons like Hannah it might have been the toast loaded with “sugar free” jam that triggered this craving. Or the large bowl of corn cereal she had with the toast. Maybe the 5 packets of sugar substitute she insists on putting in her morning coffee.

Loading up on a breakfast with empty carbs and sugar free products – served up by kind hearted nursing assistants, wanting to make all those Hannah’s happy is her problem.

Would she go back to her unit in the nursing home angry? Of course she did.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

DEMENTIA CARE – DRESSING FOR CAREGIVING, USING COLOR

The traditional color for healthcare workers has been white. There are good reasons for this. Many times when I have walked into a bedroom of an elderly confused person to check on them, if the elder wakes they immediately say “nurse”. I would reassure them that everything was alright, but that white uniform said much more.

White of course reflects and stands out in a dark room making the caregiver easier to see. White is connected in everyone’s brain with good, pure, heavenly, and clean. This perception doesn’t change when a person gets old or confused.

On the other hand when an athletic team wants to intimidate their opponent they will wear black. A team dressed in all black will look larger and more dangerous. Add a little red to that athletic uniform and red adds the message stay away, danger.

Any clothing in very dark, almost black, colors might be difficult for a confused elder to see, and they may only see black. Happy colors are in the yellow family. Also light green is considered a color that improves mental functioning. Green has been shown to improve test results with students, and light blue is shown to be a stay-awake color. The combination of white with yellow, light green or light blue is the perfect combination for caregiving.

Archive pictures show Florence Nightingale in her familiar uniform of long black dress. But that dress was softened by her white lace collar and lacy cap. Even pictures in her old age showed her in the same combination with the addition of a white lace shawl. However, for many years the color of healthcare has been white.

Every time research is conducted on what profession people think is the most trustworthy, nursing rises to the top. So dress the part, especially if you provide care at night, wear white and you will hear your elder say “nurse.”

Virginia Garberding RN
Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing