AGGRESSIVE DEMENTIA BEHAVIORS PUSHING, YELLING AND SPITTING

Persons with dementia may at times have difficult behaviors. Behaviors that may cause harm to themselves or others. Aggressive dementia behaviors, apply to pushing, yelling, hitting, grabbing, spitting or even trying to bite the caregiver. Persons with dementia who have these combative or harmful behaviors are considered to have aggressive behaviors. Some aggressive dementia behaviors are predictable and follow a pattern of actions or events. While other aggressive behaviors are isolated one time, events.

There are three basic types of aggressive behavior triggers:

  • Something is affecting the person with dementia internally such as a medical, social or psychological cause. This could be anything from pain, fear, frustration, hunger, thirst, unable to communicate, or needing to go to the bathroom.
  • Environmental triggers have to do with items, actions or events that cause over stimulation which turns into aggression. It might be that the environment is too noisy, temperature is too hot or cold, lighting is to bright or too dark, or maybe the person just doesn’t recognize any of the people around him.
  • The “caregiver trigger” applies to whomever is providing care for the person with dementia. It could be that the caregiver is tired or over stressed and not using the best communication techniques. They might not be providing care the way the person prefers or they just don’t know the likes and dislikes of the person they are caring for and, because of their poor care,  cause the behavior.

Knowing the person you are caring for can prevent those aggressive behaviors that follow a pattern and are predictable. Observe  the person’s body language, watch for wringing of the hands, rubbing their body, clenching fists, gritting teeth or the person can become extremely quiet before an episode of aggression. Knowing the person can prevent injury from aggressive dementia behaviors.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing 

DEMENTIA – BAD BEHAVIOR AND HOLIDAYS

Children act out in the days leading up to holidays and parents shake their heads and say ” he has had too much sugar.” That may very well be true, yet children are certainly impacted by the hustle and bustle of holidays. And just as children are overwhelmed by the activities and anticipation, even more so is the elder with dementia.

However when the elder with dementia becomes angry and uncooperative, no one says “he has just had too much sugar.” And very often the solution proposed is some form of isolation, where what the elder may need is just the opposite. The elder with dementia may push family away with angry behaviors such as yelling, screaming, even pushing and at times throwing things.

There are also behaviors that are not as physical but equally as troubling such as, pacing, complaining, repeating themselves and general restlessness. What is important to remember is that the elder with dementia is not acting this way on purpose. The elder with dementia is always trying to understand his environment. Where he is, who is there, what is going on and most of all what might be expected of him.

While holidays are great is so many ways for the person with dementia, the music, colors, food, smells and decorations reinforce what is happening. The increase in  people, excitement, noise can push an already stressed elder over the edge. This is a good time for old fashion remedies. Activities that are calm, quiet and one on one.

  • a hand massage helps with anxiety, worry, sadness, and fearfulness
  • the old fashion back rub works wonderfully for those  in chronic pain or exhibiting irritability and anger
  • a foot massage provides calming for those with hyperactive behaviors, restlessness and pacing
  • massaging the forehead, temples and scalp help with tension and headaches

Added to the calming effect of the physical-therapeutic touch, some light smelling aroma, and you might be giving the best gift.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

 

8 QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN CAREGIVING FOR THE PERSON WITH DEMENTIA AND DIFFICULT BEHAVIORS

The person with dementia no longer reacts the way they used to, many times resulting in problem behaviors. When you have identified a problem behavior, which can be anything from the elder spitting, to striking out at a caregiver, or even becoming sexually inappropriate, start with identifying exactly what is happening.

8 Steps to understanding difficult behaviors in the person with dementia:

  1. Identify the problem or behavior. Make sure you are clear as to what the problem is, and whose problem is it. In the case of the elder with dementia who spits; it is embarrassing, someone has to clean it up, and many times it is hard to find a caregiver for the elder.
  2. Identify when this behavior occurs. Does this behavior only happen during times of direct care? Such as the elder who strikes out during times of dressing, bathing, or brushing teeth.
  3. Identify how often this behavior happens. Does this behavior only happen occasionally, as during a large holiday get together? Does this behavior happen only later in the day when the elder is tired?
  4. Identify how long the behavior lasts. Is this behavior of short duration, and once the incident is over it is quickly forgotten by the elder?
  5. Identify what is going on in the environment when the behavior happens. Is the environment understandable to the elder? Remember the elder with dementia needs a time of transition between activities. He can no longer just switch from one conversation to another, or do several things at the same time such as eating and watching TV.
  6. Identify who is present when the behavior happens. Does someone present tend to startle or surprise the elder? Does someone seem to not know how to approach the elder? Is someone asking a lot of questions the elder is no longer able to understand? Does someone have expectations of the elder that they are no longer able to meet? Does someone present seem to be critical of the elder.
  7. Identify how intense the behavior is. Is this behavior of such intensity that is scares the elder as well as all who are present?
  8. Identify if there is more than one thing contributing to the problem. Especially if the elder has been having trouble sleeping and may be suffering from sleep deprivation. If the elder’s behavior becomes more difficult in the late afternoon, see if the elder has an problem with oxygen deprivation. Many elders who are more agitated later in the day may benefit from a sleep study.

Finding out what happened right before, or what is happening during the behavior, is of the most importance, when care giving for the person with dementia.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing

 

DEMENTIA CARE – DECORATING FOR DEMENTIA – CREATING A SMART ENVIRONMENT

Lets face it we cannot get away from environment.  We are always in some kind of environment, but is it a healthy environment or troublesome environment? And for the person with dementia many things we take for granted in the environment are unhealthy as well as troublesome. These are environmental stressers that the person with dementia either hears, sees, or think they see.

Hearing stressors, are anything that is too loud. This can be the rattle and clink of utensils in a restaurant or even the voices when several people are talking at the same time, at the next table.  Anything that causes constant noise, like the TV or radio.  It will also be things that cause sporadic loud noises like a vacuum or landscapers.

A hearing stressor can also be when the person, who is trying to communicate with the confused person, just talks too fast. If the person is trying to understand, and can’t even catch the words, trying so hard will be stressful. And creates an environmental stress, where the person just seems to want to get away.

Things you commonly see in an environment can be very stressful for the confused person. When a person with advanced dementia looks at a shiny floor, it can appear as if there is water on the floor. Or even worse, that there is ice on the floor. A dark area of a carpet or tile can look like there is a big hole in the floor. Another frequent problem with flooring is small patterns. A carpet with obvious patterns will look like there is something on the floor. Many an elderly person has fallen trying to pick up something that wasn’t there.

The demented person does need contrast in color to be able to see the difference in surfaces. In a bathroom, if the tile floor is solid white and the toilet white, the person will have difficulty locating the toilet. He just doesn’t see white on white. In the same way when eating, a white plate on a white table, needs a colored place mat under the plate for the person to see it.

Keep this in mind, when walking around the house, think of contrast in doorways and furniture compared to wall color as well as floor color. Using the environment for great dementia care.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing