AGGRESSIVE DEMENTIA BEHAVIORS PUSHING, YELLING AND SPITTING

Persons with dementia may at times have difficult behaviors. Behaviors that may cause harm to themselves or others. Aggressive dementia behaviors, apply to pushing, yelling, hitting, grabbing, spitting or even trying to bite the caregiver. Persons with dementia who have these combative or harmful behaviors are considered to have aggressive behaviors. Some aggressive dementia behaviors are predictable and follow a pattern of actions or events. While other aggressive behaviors are isolated one time, events.

There are three basic types of aggressive behavior triggers:

  • Something is affecting the person with dementia internally such as a medical, social or psychological cause. This could be anything from pain, fear, frustration, hunger, thirst, unable to communicate, or needing to go to the bathroom.
  • Environmental triggers have to do with items, actions or events that cause over stimulation which turns into aggression. It might be that the environment is too noisy, temperature is too hot or cold, lighting is to bright or too dark, or maybe the person just doesn’t recognize any of the people around him.
  • The “caregiver trigger” applies to whomever is providing care for the person with dementia. It could be that the caregiver is tired or over stressed and not using the best communication techniques. They might not be providing care the way the person prefers or they just don’t know the likes and dislikes of the person they are caring for and, because of their poor care,  cause the behavior.

Knowing the person you are caring for can prevent those aggressive behaviors that follow a pattern and are predictable. Observe  the person’s body language, watch for wringing of the hands, rubbing their body, clenching fists, gritting teeth or the person can become extremely quiet before an episode of aggression. Knowing the person can prevent injury from aggressive dementia behaviors.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing 

SENIOR WITH ALZHEIMER’S DEMENTIA CHANGES TRYING TO COMMUNICATE

Of all of the changes the family sees in their loved one with Alzheimer’s dementia, the most frightening is personality and behavioral changes.  When the senior with dementia acts childish, irrational, stubborn, suspicious, paranoid, or becomes physically combative, the caregiver can be frightened.  The caregiver can feel that the relationship is over, this person is now a stranger.

These behaviors are not only frightening for the caregiver but even more so for the person with dementia.  Preventing behaviors is always the goal, and so much easier that dealing with a full burst of anger.

Preventing bad behaviors:

  • be alert and aware to what is going on in the environment – if the last time Grandpa became angry were there too many people, too much talking, too much noise, just too much stimulation?
  • arguing with a person with dementia never works, the person just doesn’t have the reasoning skills any longer to engage in finding solutions – divert attention and head off any confrontations
  • respect and protect the elder’s dignity , there is a real reason why bathing is such a hard task for someone with dementia – being undressed is a huge loss of control
  • make every task as simple as possible – breakdown the task into one step at a time – even though this slows progress – slow and happy is much better than fast and unhappy
  • reassure, and reassure again and again – the elder is very afraid of being abandoned – even the most demanding elder is basically afraid of abandonment

The elder with dementia doesn’t mean to be difficult. Difficult behaviors are a means of communication by the elder. The elder knows that they are missing something everyone else understands. The changes the elder feels they are no longer able to communicate with words. So the elder will try to gain control over their environment through – behaviors.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing