LET MUSIC HELP WITH DEMENTIA CARE

Anyone who has ever attended a concert has experienced a large group of people with synchronized brains. As a piece of music is played with emotion, dopamine is released in the brain and a person experiences pleasure. Added to that, a recognizable rhythm pattern and everyone’s brain is happy and synchronized.

Music affects deep emotions in the brain, releasing dopamine. As soon as a well-loved melody begins, small amounts of dopamine are released in the brain in anticipation. Anticipation, of the strong emotional, well remembered places in the music, yet to come. You know those parts that everyone remembers and sings along to. During especially emotional moments in the music an increase of dopamine is released. Dopamine makes, listening to familiar music with familiar rhythm, very rewarding for the listener.

Dopamine has long been considered the feel good neurotransmitter in the brain. A high level of dopamine helps with physical movement, positive emotions and is the reward transmitter. Many positive things in life can increase dopamine in the brain and music is one of them.

When a piece of music is unfamiliar the brain tries to search for that familiar rhythm, or note sequence. In the case of a jazz piece where there are odd or unexpected rhythms. The brain can’t connect to something familiar. Not only will dopamine not be released, but the experience may become difficult, stressful and unpleasant.

Give the confused person with dementia an opportunity to have that happy, good feeling music has to offer. Play some familiar music that allows the listener to “feel” a memory. Then go the extra step and synchronize your brains, sing along.

Virginia Garberding RN
Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing