DEMENTIA STAGES – TIME LINE

While every person with dementia has a different experience and progression. For dementia symptoms that follow the decline due to Alzheimer’s disease, these changes can be tracked in the following way.

Mild Cognitive Impairment: Very early changes noted in areas of forgetfulness, problems in locating lost/misplaced objects and loss of words. Changes cause concern yet mild cognitive impairment does not always progress to dementia. Many elderly people never experience an increase in this level of confusion. (this lose can occur very gradually over up to 10 years)

Very Early Dementia: No longer able to be gainfully employed, may becoming lost in familiar community, experiences anxiety due to having trouble always understanding environment.   Very important at this time to have hearing and vision checked to support the elder in understanding the environment. (2 years)

Early Dementia: Now diagnosed with dementia, possibly of the Alzheimer’s type, no longer able to handle finances, trouble identifying money, no longer able to do meal planning, no longer driving, unable to live independently, flattening of expression  (most noticeable in family group photos), emotional problems, withdrawn, tearfulness and sometimes anger. Starting to have problems with appropriate clothing choices and hygiene. (2 years)

Mid-Dementia Stage: Now need caregiver support for hands on assistance in hygiene, bathing, dressing, toileting, brushing teeth, significant problems with communication uses few words, is now incontinent of urine and beginning to be incontinent of bowel as well. Continues to be able to eat independently but totally dependent in all other areas of eating even cutting food and pouring beverages. (2 years)

Late Stage Dementia: Total care in all areas of life, need to be physically fed all foods, non-verbal, few people can walk at this point,  and requiring to be re-positioned when in bed, no longer moves independently.

Dementia stages vary depending on the disease causing the dementia, most notably in dementia caused by delirium or early onset dementia. The person with early onset dementia who is diagnosed at a young age goes through the dementia stages at a much faster pace.

Virginia Garberding RN

Certified in Gerontology and Restorative Nursing